Carbon 14 dating the giza pyramids

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The next mission into the Queen’s Chamber shafts would have two primary objectives: Send a robot crawler up QCS to explore the space behind the first blocking slab using the same opening Pyramid Rover had drilled, determine if the rough block at the opposite side was the end of the shaft or another blocking slab, and if the latter, drill a hole through it and see what is behind it.Send a robot crawler up QCN to drill a hole through blocking slab and see what is on the other side.Through interviews and exchanges with the Djedi Project manager, Shaun Whitehead, as well as other team members, this article promises to be Pyramid Rover was a successful reconnaissance mission into the southern shaft coming out of the Queen’s Chamber (QCS).The mission had confirmed that the 20 x 20 cm blocking slab and the final section of U-block were made of a higher quality type of limestone than the rest of the shaft, most likely the fine limestone quarried at Tura rather than the rougher local yellow limestone.The SCA had a group of Egyptologists and engineers from Cairo University design a limestone “competition tunnel” in the desert that mimicked the actual pyramid shafts as nearly as possible in terms of size, slope, and conditions.The panel of judges was an impressive list of experts.Rover successfully drilled a small hole in the slab, about 2 cm in diameter, while inflicting as little damage as possible.

Even the view of the opposite block was limited by the quality of the light.

The next robot would need to be able to look up and down and from side to side, as well as take a look at the back of the blocking slab.

One of the most curious features of the shafts is the copper pins in the two blocking slabs.

What the Pyramid Rover team discovered was a small chamber formed by the Tura limestone U-block, the basal stone, the blocking slab/door, and a rough block of the local limestone on the opposite side, about 19 cm away from the “door.” But the probe camera had its limitations.

It was fixed inside a rigid tube and had no tilt or pan capabilities—all it could do was look straight ahead.

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